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Complete Recommended Kids Dirt Bike Gear For $1000

This guide serves as a summarized form of all our kids dirt bike gear reviews. I'll provide you with my recommended gear for each category. If you'd like more details on any piece of gear, I'll also include a link to the full review should you wish to check out some of the alternative options. I've offered my gear suggestions with best value for money item at mind. The complete list of gear will cost you just over $1000.
best kids dirt bike gear

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Dirt biking is a wonderful hobby and sport for kids to pursue. It teaches them several important life lessons and skills, but you’re not here to read about those. Your kid’s already shown a strong interest in twist grips, kick stands, and helmet hair over playing with footballs, Barbie dolls, and puzzles. Even your wife’s happy with the idea. However, before she changes her mind, you’d better get her to sign off on a budget to kit your kid out in safety gear.

In this article we’ll help you narrow down your shopping list with the best kids dirt bike gear. This includes the top 50cc dirt bikes for kids, boots, helmets, gloves, goggles, chest protectors/roost guards, knee braces, and neck braces.

Helmets:

The right fit is of utmost importance when it comes to selecting a dirt bike helmet. When shopping for a kid’s dirt bike helmet, it is best to have your youngster try on as many different brands and models to find one that best fits them. If the helmet fits loosely, it will be of no use in a crash – and if it is too tight, it will be uncomfortable to wear and may become too hot inside for the rider.

Apart from a proper fit, a helmet must meet ECE, DOT and/ or SNELL safety ratings. These are the industry’s standard safety certifications. With one or more of these on the helmet, you’ll be assured that the latest safety technology will provide the necessary protection for your little one in the event of a fall.

Don’t get too bogged down in finding a helmet with a myriad of features: the important design features to concentrate on are good ventilation, moisture-wicking inner liners and padding, removable and washable pads, comfortable chin strap and closure system, and a low weight for enhanced comfort. Decals, colors, and shapes play secondary roles when it comes to helmets.

Goggles:

Goggles might not seem as if they’re important safety items – until a stone hits you in the eye, that is. Goggles protect your kids’ eyes from large objects such as rocks and stones flying off from other bikes or their bike’s front tire. They also protect their eyes from sand and dirt entering their eyes. That is painful and can also lead to permanently damaged vision. Goggles make it safer to ride over dirt and they provide clear vision for riders to pick the best lines around turns and obstacles.

Goggles’ lenses also provide UV protection, and the best ones are coated with anti-fogging treatments and scratch-resistant films to ensure clear vision and durability. Tear-off visor posts are nice-to-have features in youth goggles, but not a must-have feature if your kid is just starting out with dirt bikes. While there are cheap goggles available from retailers, don’t skimp on safety: rather buy trusted equipment from reputable brands that design and develop their goggles to provide the highest levels of safety to their riders.

The wider the goggles viewing window, the better peripheral views it will provide. In dirt biking, and motorcycling in general, the greater the peripheral view the greater the safety of the rider in avoiding accidents, obstacles, and other riders.

Neck Braces:


With the helmet as the top safety kit, a neck brace is also a must-have safety item. In the event of a crash, neck braces absorb the impact that would normally be sent through the rider’s head and neck. These braces protect your head and neck from serious injury, rotational forces, jolts, and from hard landings.

Neck braces for the youth – like their helmets – must fit properly. The rider’s helmet mustn’t sit too high above the neck brace as you want the neck brace to actually limit the amount of movement from the helmet, head, and neck. The closer the neck brace sits to the helmet, the less mobility the neck brace will offer the head. Adjusting the neck brace to fit perfectly will take a few riding sessions to master.

It must be noted upfront that neck braces aren’t the most comfortable of equipment to wear. That’s why finding one that’s lightweight will help to reduce that discomfort. Looking for neck braces with adjustable features also helps to set them up for a more comfortable fit. Buying a neck brace that fits under your chest protector/roost guard helps to keep the neck brace in place.

Chest Protectors and Roost Guards:

Chest protectors and roost guards aren’t the same thing, although many think so. A chest protector is developed for trail and enduro riding, while a roost deflector is aimed at motocross riders. These two items of kit differ in the amount of protection they provide riders. Chest protectors are like body armor by covering more of the body, including the shoulders and arms. Roost guards focus on protecting the central region of the chest only and are lighter and less intrusive to your body’s movements. A chest protector is bulkier to protect the young rider from a greater variety of falls, crashes, and obstacles.

Determining the type of riding your kid will do will lead you to buying the appropriate body protection. Either way, buying a reputable brand’s products will mean the chest protector or roost guard has passed various safety certifications. Chest protectors and roost guards might seem overkill, but they have been developed to protect ribs and organs from impacts. Accidents happen all the time and anything can happen. These pieces of equipment help to reduce the risk of injury.

Gloves:

Your child is going to fall more than once. They’ll probably fall more than once on their first lap of their local MX track. Gloves serve to protect their hands from getting cut up and scraped, protect their fingers from bending out of shape, and protect them from things landing on them such as their bike’s handlebars and levers. In terms of performance, gloves also provide better grip on the handlebars no matter the weather, and gloves also provide padding on the palm areas to prevent bruising in the case of falls and crashes.

Knee Braces:

Knee braces protect knees and shins during falls and crashes. MX knee braces are designed and developed to prevent the hyperextension of the knee joint when jumping and landing. Even for youngsters with flexible joints, the impact of landing a jump on the knee is excessive. Repeated landings can create a weakness in those joints, and that’s where knee braces come into action by relieving the knee of those knocks and tensions.

Another area that set knee braces out as essential kit is when riders take corners. The proper technique is used to help balance the rider and dirt bike, but many riders incorrectly put their foot onto the ground for a moment. That’s when knee injuries strike: the knee is twisted or turned, and it can tear the ACL, meniscus and MCL to create lifelong knee problems.

Apart from learning proper cornering techniques, the use of a knee brace helps to provide added support to the knee to reduce the amount of stress it carries. There are several manufacturers of knee braces offering many designs. Knee braces for kids aren’t simply scaled down versions of adult models. Instead, they offer protection and support in different ways.

There are a few considerations to make when selecting a knee brace: hinge mechanisms absorb most of the energy in impacts, and knee braces are featured with single or dual hinge mechanisms. Dual hinge mechanisms are favored by MX riders. Knee braces with a single hinge on the outside are preferred by trail and enduro riders as these provide a greater range of motion of the knee joint for cornering and bike balance.

Knee braces also come in different sizes. The best advice is to study the sizing charts of the prospective knee brace brand’s pages for an accurate measurement. Each rider is of a different size, body type, and age, and those factors determine the size of the knee brace.

While knee braces are costly, knee guards are far more affordable and might seem like better alternatives. However, knee guards only offer protection for direct impacts and don’t offer the support that knee braces do in protecting the knees against rotational forces and other knee stressors.

Boots:

This might be the last item on our list, but it is most certainly not the last in our list of priority purchases. Dirt bike boots for kids are as important as running shoes to a runner. These protect the feet and ankles from injury. Safety is the number one priority of dirt bike boots: they provide coverage for your shin, your lower leg, ankle, heel, and foot, and boots are constructed with hardened plates to maintain a rigid shape no matter what.

Sizing is a difficult area to get right when considering buying kids’ boots because they’re still growing. Always buy kids’ boots with a bit of extra room for them to grow into the boots. You certainly don’t want to be buying a new pair of dirt bike boots each year.

When looking at boots, ensure they have steel toe guards, a double insole, strong panels over the shin, calf and ankle areas, and easy-to-use clasp functions to secure the foot to their boot.

Dirt Bikes:

Searching for 50 cc dirt bikes for kids aged 4-7 years old will return dozens of listings on your favorite search engine. Most of those are probably from brands you’ve never heard of before, and it’s difficult to find any reputable reviews of those affordable 50 cc dirt bikes.

Trying to keep costs as low as possible is always your number one priority. When researching kids’ dirt bikes, you’ll realize that “name brand” 50 cc dirt bikes hold their value even after a few years. They’re incredible pieces of engineering, and they’re worth the initial outlay. In a few years’ time when your youngster moves up to a bigger class of dirt bike, you’ll be able to sell this 50 cc dirt bike for nearly as much as you paid for it new.

In selecting a dirt bike for your child, you need to consider their abilities, height, and weight. There are 2 types of 50 cc dirt bikes – and you don’t want their first bike to put them off from motorcycles forever. They design these different bikes for different size kids and skill levels. The 2 types of kids’ 50 cc dirt bikes are developed according to their seat heights. A “mini” 50 cc dirt bike has a seat height of around 21” while a regular 50 cc dirt bike is 27”.  What this means is that the larger of the 50 cc bikes can tackle and conquer rougher terrain at higher speeds for a more race-ready flavor. Those bikes with taller seat heights are usually aimed at MX riding and the “mini” versions for trails and enduro riding.

All 50 cc dirt bikes have push-button electric starters and automatic clutches, and all can accommodate training wheels to help your youngster get up to speed and build confidence on two wheels, no matter the surface or terrain.

My Recommendation

Yamaha PW50

Approximate Cost: $1,749 (new) and from $1,300 to $1600 (for a 2-5-year-old used model)

Final Checkpoint:

Are you still sure your wife is happy with your son or daughter taking up dirt bike riding? Take the credit card and start buying the right safety kit for them. From head to toe, this ultimate gear guide will help you to better understand what is needed from the kit to protect your youngster, while also learning which items in the various categories are the best-rated.

Ensuring your child’s safety is essential. We wouldn’t skimp on any of these safety items, nor would we leave off any of these when they want to go riding. Crashes and falls happen in an instant and you want them to be as best protected as they possibly can be.

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